Why you should account for introversion during the hiring process

A candidate that is quiet or shy may be an introvert.

A candidate that is quiet or shy may be an introvert.

During the hiring process, it is important to not only find the candidates that are the best fit for the role, but to also consider how they will be able to work alongside existing team members. Introverts often make great job candidates, but due to their quieter nature, may be overlooked during hiring. 

One of the times where an oversight may occur is during a job interview. Before responding to a question, an introverted person may take more time to consider their answer than an extrovert would. Additionally, they may be less likely to volunteer information about their life or "sell" themselves. 

As an article from HR Morning points out, introverts make valuable contributions in the workplace through their patience and ability to put a great deal of thought and insight into their work. 

However, according to an article in the Financial Times, organizations are more likely to hire people who exhibit more extroverted traits. Despite this trend, introverted leaders deliver better outcomes than extroverted ones, according to a study from the management school at the University of Pennsylvania.

"They can let themselves down in the recruitment process by coming across as shy, quiet, secretive, reactive and low energy. People usually do not realize how great an introverted candidate is until the second or third interview – or maybe even later – which means they can miss opportunities," Nicola McHale of the Institute of Recruiters told the Financial times.  

With this in mind, departments may want to give additional consideration to the interview process to be certain that a great candidate is not ruled out because they may seem quieter or more reserved at first. HR software solutions enables HR departments to manage the essential details that go into finding the right candidates for open positions.