Why managers should monitor employees

Monitoring an employee's on-the-job performance can increase work productivity.

Monitoring an employee's on-the-job performance can increase work productivity.

Employees spend a large bulk of their time at work and sometimes, it can be tempting to get off course. Especially with the internet, where the digital world of movies, music and radio shows are a few clicks away, it is possible to get distracted and lose work productivity without notice. 

In order to reduce the chances of this happening, HR software solutions can analyze the business' processes to see if specific workers are not pulling their weight.

A group of MIT researchers recently completed a study with major restaurant chains and found that using Restaurant Guard, a proprietary theft-detection program, improved how an employee worked. Restaurants greatly depend on accurate reporting because a few dollars can determine a profit of loss, Harvard Business Review contributor Andrew McAfee explained.

Within the food and drink industry specifically, companies lose at least $200 billion per year due to theft. Whether that be giving away meals or managers stealing cash, it is a concern that needs to be controlled.

After the study was completed, restaurants that used the software found that weekly revenue went up by 7 percent, about $2,975 per week—largely  by preventing losses from drinks, which is where theft occurs the most often. Once it wasn't so easy to steal from work, employees realized that they could only raise  their income by working harder, increasing overall work productivity.

So, although some workers may think that monitoring services are invasive, they need to consider the fact that supervisors are supposed to check their team's "on-the-job performance."