When it comes to disclosing sensitive company information some secrets are necessary

Employers should be careful with who they share company information with.

Employers should be careful with who they share company information with.

One of the most important functions that human resources departments have a hand in is managing the relationship between the company and each employee. From the hiring process to providing accurate and up-to-date information on company policies, HR's role in keeping employees engaged in the business is vital for overall synergy. HR consulting companies help organize administrative tasks so that there is more time for members of each department to get to know each other on a personal level.

A new trend in professional relationships within the company is openness. Management leaders have come to believe that there should be no secrets regarding company information.

According to Jams Heskett's blog post on Forbes, Vineet Nayar  vice chairman and co-management director a tech company in India told the New York Times that, "We are completely open. We put all the dirty linen on the table, and we answer everyone's questions. We inverted the pyramid of the organization and made reverse accountability a reality."

However, Heskett questions this policy by comparing it to the recent incident in which Edward Snowden, a former contractor for the NSA, leaked top secret government information. The point Heskett concluded with was that businesses contain confidential information that dictates their success, and it is not always appropriate to share this information with employees that may not hold permanent positions. 

Some degree of trust is necessary to ensure that tasks get accomplished and employees feel valued, but managing relationships and determining who has access to certain information is a delicate process. HR software solutions can help organize company policies, so that each member of the business understands where they stand.