What will make HR gamification work for businesses this year?

Adopting 'gamification' appears to be a leading trend for 2015.

Adopting 'gamification' appears to be a leading trend for 2015.

Is gamification a way to make HR processes more effective? With improving employee engagement a challenge for enterprises, applying game-like elements to important functions has emerged as one possible tactic.

Like many other changes to traditional company operations, a strong strategy and means of "gamifying" impacts whether or not an employee base will be receptive to this plan. Some may not be good candidates for a gamified system, but in specific cases the results could be improved interest and interaction.

In an article for Forbes, contributor Jeanne Meister looked at real-world examples of HR projects that involve aspects of gaming. PwC Hungary, for example, developed Multipoly, a simulation game for recruitment candidates designed to make interviewing and starting a job at the company easier. According to the source, it turned out to be a success, with the numbers of job candidates growing by 190 percent.

Presenting a solution that is dynamic and fun has a novelty value, and has the further potential to lure users in and accomplish HR goals effectively. Saying that HR gamification is ready to become a more widely adopted trend among HR systems this year, Meister says companies should base their strategies around particular department goals.

"Identify and articulate specific business objectives you are trying to achieve with gamification," she writes. "In the case of PwC Hungry, it was engaging job candidates in learning more about the firm before they entered the interview process."

For some, HR might need a radical new design that converts standard HR functions into something more effective and easier to deploy. HR project management consultants will guide the implementation process to attend to the demands of a complex system, which often need continuous oversight to be launched efficiently.