The challenges of a job offer

Now that you found the best candidate for the position, reel them in.

Now that you found the best candidate for the position, reel them in.

Recruiting is a large aspect of the human resources department's responsibility, and the task is always a challenge. Staff members have to figure out how many positions are available as well as a compensation package template. At this point, human resources departments can use HR software solutions to vet candidate to see if they meet the employer's minimum requirements. After weeks of research and interviews, it is then time to issue job offers to the strongest candidates.

How much time spent on this process varies, but depending on the number of individuals who participate, the search may impact the company's productivity. As much as the hiring manager wants the best candidate, the question is, how does one find the "best candidate?" Often times, hiring managers choose a candidate who is the most similar to themselves, believing these attributes and skill sets already work for the organization.

However, this approach could be problematic, especially because he or she may not be the choice the company needs. During a time where the pool of quality candidates appears extremely small, it is important to choose wisely. Use HR software to see the interviewer's notes about the prospective hire. Asking for additional input from previous employers can also be valuable.

As About.com contributor Susan Heathfield puts it, asking past supervisors offers a "gold mine" of information because "people change, but not that much."

This may be time-consuming during a busy time, where the race to seal the deal is steadfast, but HR software allows some of these tasks to be divided up across multiple staff members. Once the decision is made, give the candidate a phone call. Some might send emails or formal letters, but in the 21st century, people are looking for immediate responses.

"[M]ake contact within a day or two at most," Inc. Magazine contributor Jeff Haden wrote about the job offer process. "Not only can you ease the candidate's stress during the post-interview waiting period but you also show how thrilled you are to make them a part of your team."

Prospective hires might be interviewing with competitors, so giving an offer in the midst of their job search could be beneficial. Haden believes that recruiters who are actively communicating with the prospect during this time can begin to develop a positive employer to employee relationship.

It can be hard for human resources to come off as personable, when the goal is to get the employee on board, but a personal touch can make a positive difference.

Aggressive and time-sensitive approaches can steer a candidate in the wrong direction, in turn wasting a lot of the company's time and resources. Instead, put all the information that was covered during the offer phone call in email form. A full job description, benefits package, and tentative deadline should be included in this letter. If compensation was covered, be sure to add that as well.