Study: Employers intend to host holiday parties, give bonuses this year

More businesses plan on throwing a holiday party this year for the first time since 2011.

More businesses plan on throwing a holiday party this year for the first time since 2011.

Signs of a stronger economy continue to pop up and right now, they are appearing in the form of holiday parties or end-of-the-year bonuses. A study from CareerBuilder found that about 59 percent of executives will throw a party for their staff members, the last time the figure was this high was in 2011, at 58 percent.

"Whether it's a party, bonus or gift, the gesture shows employees that their efforts are appreciated and valued," Rosemary Haefner, vice president of human resources at Career Builder, told Forbes Magazine. "During the recession and immediately following it, many companies had to cut back on holiday perks due to financial constraints."

The organizations that have chosen to indulge their employees this season have plans to spend either the same amount, or more than they did before the recession occurred in 2009. If employers do choose to go toward the bonus check route, members of the payroll department need to be notified in advance because they may need to process the check using HR software solutions before the company closes for the holiday.

If a business intends on hosting a party this season, executives can also share that announcement through the company's HR software. The holidays are a common time for staff members to request paid time off, so employees will like be using the program already, which makes that space a great place to remind workers about the party.

Even though these common holiday-related benefits are not required under the Fair Labor Standards Act (FLSA), providing these perks can still be a great way to spread positive energy across departments and floors.