Report: Recruiting IT workers requires more than offering a paycheck

Technology workers have the upper hand these days, so human resources will need to identify how they make a strong case to these candidates.

We have discussed how the shortage of technology workers has had human resources departments scrambling. Research from Computerworld suggests another difficulty: these candidates are looking for more than a stable salary. Whether it be a chief information officer, application developer or computer engineer, these professionals are aware of their value, so it's going to take more than a competitive compensation package to reel them in.

"In our recovering economy, [information technology] workers are growing more confident," Shravan Goli, president of IT staffing firm Dice wrote in its company's survey on salary. "The job market is good, with a lot more jobs out there.

This is not to say that a great starting salary won't make candidates take a second look at the job description, because it is still a priority among 49 percent of respondents, but other popular demands include job stability (45 percent) and a challenging opportunity (34 percent). 

"Most tech jobs pay pretty well," Goli explained to Computerworld. "So where is the additional motivation to come from? Tech professionals in particular find fulfillment in challenge and innovative environments."

These intangible benefits aren't easy to fish out from a job description or a resume, so HR software solutions will need to use specific filters to identify which job seekers might be a great fit for the vacant positions.

Why should businesses consider using HR software to find high-quality candidates? Because there are hundreds of businesses out there searching from the same pool of individuals, and that group is constantly shrinking.

PricewaterhouseCooper (PwC) is considered one of the biggest health care consulting firms in the world, and they too have struggled to keep staff members on board for more than a few years. According to Toni Cusumano, PwC's People and Change Leader in the United States' technology sector, Millennial workers want more than a "place" to work. 

They actually look for a flexible work culture, one that will enable them to have a better work-life balance. Some consider this alternative valuable to their contribution to their personal "social purpose."

"Who said the younger generation is too high maintenance? They're actually more open to feedback than their older colleagues," Cusumano added.

Human resources departments that are trying to develop an effective strategy to attract techies should keep these requests in mind. When a candidate inquires about a position, feel free to mention these perks, since it may be the push they need to commit to the offer. Once they do, be sure to highlight these expectations in the company's HR software, so the supervisor is well aware of these accommodations in advance.