Identity theft a taxing problem for companies

Some companies are finding that recent college graduates are doing more for less.

Some companies are finding that recent college graduates are doing more for less.

When is comes to the hiring process, particularly for startups, one of the best qualities that can be found in a candidate is motivation and a desire to work their way up the ladder. In a recent article for the New York Times, Cliff Oxford, the founder of the Oxford Center for Entrepreneurs, examined a certain demographic of employees who have emerged as entitled when it comes to what they expect from a job.

In his piece, Oxford remarks that this "privileged" group of workers is not, as many believe, this most recent batch of college graduates. Instead, he believes the type of prospective employees that come in expecting a certain level of compensation and conditions for a job are those graduates' parents.

According to Oxford, those who entered this current abysmal job market are more prepared to take on the high-expectation, low-compensation jobs. Meanwhile, older workers, who have come to expect certain things for their employers, have yet to adjust.

"Those who have graduated from college in the last five years have the upper hand in landing these new jobs in the fast-growth companies where most new jobs are created," he writes in his piece. "When I interview recent graduates, I sometimes feel as though I am talking to my dad, who lived through the Great Depression and never really got over it."

With this in mind, Oxford writes that, when he does participate in the hiring process, he tends to favor those who have just entered the job market and are therefore more likely to take what is given to them and focus more on working than what they are given.

By working with an HR consulting firm, companies can discover the most successful hiring practices and what to look for in a new employee.