Human resources may be known by new name

According to some, the very name "human resources" is changing in a way that reflects a new goal.

According to some, the very name "human resources" is changing in a way that reflects a new goal.

Human resources seems to be evolving, and with that comes the need for departments to prepare for necessary changes. An article for HRE Daily notes that in the future, the term "human resources" might undergo a shift into something more specific, like "chief talent officer." While this article emphasizes the superficiality of this trend, it does suggest a similar shift in the way professionals relate to workers, which might in turn necessitate a new HR system implementation that addresses worker retention.

This article references another one by Jacob Morgan that appeared in Forbes as well as other sources. Morgan says that the change in titles may also indicate a new organizational approach for companies to take. The essential functions of Human Resources may still be important even as they turn the focus to different things, Morgan argues, and he notes that this trend has been in motion for some years.

"I think in the coming years we will see more companies shift away from "HR" related terminology to focus on things related to people and talent,"  he writes. "The question is, will these organizations do more than change names and titles? Will they actually rethink what their roles and functions are?" Examples of companies with new "people-focused" titles that Morgan references include Google and Cisco, the latter of which now has a "Chief People Officer" instead of a CHRO.

If talent management hasn't taken hold at your organization yet, rethinking the technology used could be part of the process of starting change. Businesses should take steps to make a new HR position title have a deeper impact on their overall effectiveness and employee interaction. With this in mind, businesses can make more proactive changes that propel them towards better productivity.