HR departments should consider candidate value beyond quantifiable skills

An employee that might not be an exact skill match could still be a great candidate.

An employee that might not be an exact skill match could still be a great candidate.

Finding the best, most closely matched employees for the job can be a challenging task for HR departments, and the process by which they go about recruiting will play a major role in the success of their efforts. 

When many other organizations are searching from the same pool of applicants, attracting top talent can be a tough task. It is important that HR departments strive to recruit candidates effectively by considering the value a candidate may bring to the table beyond being an exact skill match.

The reality that HR has strayed from its original intended purpose is discussed in a Forbes article that importantly notes how "HR has effectively transformed labor into a kind of investment banking, with people analyzed and packaged instead of shares." What if HR departments are using screening methods that actually eliminate good candidates?

While HR used to be tasked with maintaining working conditions, the burden on HR departments today to find the best workers has spawned hiring methods that focus narrowly on individual achievements as "a pre-requisite for being considered basically employable," according to the article.

This has lead to screening methods that might weed out employees that do not meet stringent skill set requirements. The key takeaway is that some candidates may not have all of the exact skills a company is looking for, but people are adaptable and should not be ruled out so quickly.

While the ability to seek out employees based on quantifiable skills is certainly valuable, HR departments should remember that employees are able to learn new skills on the job and adapt to new situations. With this in mind, departments can look to recruit from a wider applicant pool.

Fortunately, businesses can turn to HR software solutions to help organize information about prospective candidates. This way, they are able to vet candidates that may not seem like the exact match for a position, but could actually turn out to be great.