Global HR performance leaves something to be desired

HR professionals have a difficult job.

HR professionals have a difficult job.

HR professionals are often tasked with some of the most difficult organizational operations. It's never easy to have to reprimand somebody formally or inform them that they've been terminated, so it's important to be able to complete these sorts of tasks efficiently and professionally. According to recent survey data from Deloitte's Human Capital Trends 2014 report, the performance of these and related duties has left something to be desired. 

Not only are executives underwhelmed with the performance of their HR professionals, those same professionals aren't too effusive about themselves, either. Thirty-four percent of HR professionals and business leaders described their human resources department as "underperforming" or "just getting by."

When asked to grade their departments, F's outnumbered A's by 2:1. Just 5 percent received the top grade, while 10 percent were rated as failing.

"While this is not intended as a criticism of HR in general, it does reflect how challenging it is to build a world-class HR function and how far companies believe they are from this goal," the report said.

That difficulty might be part of the reason why 39 percent of companies have no plans to increase investment in HR, more than the 34 percent that plan to add expenditure in that area. Simply put, it is difficult for organizations to accurately map out a plan to improve their human resource departments. 

Human resources are a valuable part of any business, so it's critical that your systems are working effectively. An HR consulting business can ensure that all of your processes are operating as they should, which in turn will keep your organization satisfied and the bottom line healthy.