Businesses host second annual 'Manufacturing Day'

"Manufacturing Day" occurs on the first Friday of October.

"Manufacturing Day" occurs on the first Friday of October.

When job seekers think about the manufacturing industry, a majority of applicants assume it is a "dark, dirty [and] difficult place to work," the Hamilton Journal-News wrote. However, similar to many trades it has become more technologically advanced and is experiencing a shortage of skilled workers.

Last Friday, more than 300 businesses across the United States hosted the second annual "Manufacturing Day," which is meant to educate parents, colleges, students and everyone in between on the actual shape of the manufacturing business. These companies opened their doors and let visitors ask questions and tour the facility.

"There's a skills gap that exists, but also there's a perception gap and both are not easily solved over a year," Matt Lavoie, spokesman for the National Association of Manufacturers, told the source. "You change perception, you get more people interested, they follow the education path and that's what fills the jobs."

After hosting these events, human resources departments may find themselves with a larger pool of applications and a need to utilize HR software solutions to streamline the hiring process. Even if some of these individuals may not have a strong background in manufacturing, those with basic shop and math skills have the potential to succeed.

"As manufacturing gets smarter and manufacturing plants get more and more automated, we need to continue to develop a work force with the skills to support that," Rockwell Automation equipment manufacturing sales manager, Paul Brannon added. "We are going to need to pull from a higher educated work force and so do our customers."

Aside from high demand, many of these positions start at $60,000 salary, which also includes medical benefits. Nonetheless, human resources departments will need to effectively screen job seekers with HR software solutions.