HR software solutions can help companies use Big Data in the hiring process

HR software solutions can help companies use Big Data to hire the right candidates.

HR software solutions can help companies use Big Data to hire the right candidates.

Applying for a job can be a long process when companies have portals full of surveys and questionnaires, but job seekers should take these HR software solutions seriously because they can determine if they will be invited for a phone or face-to-face interview.

Automated systems have been extremely helpful for companies in many sectors, but hiring the right candidates and placing them in right positions can still be challenging. Human resources departments have the opportunity to gather more accurate results using Big Data. For example, recruiters can use feedback from current employees as a base for evaluating prospective hires. 

"People are our biggest resource, and right now a lot of them are mismatched," Erik Brynjolfsson, a professor at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology, told Bloomberg. "If you put the right kind of person in the right task, it's good for that person and it's good for the company."

Hiring managers should consider customizing their HR software solutions for specific departments, allowing applicants to answer questions directly related to the position that they are applying for. General business or industry-related responses may not fully explain their capabilities to the prospective employer's team. These changes may take some time, but the results will still be summarized efficiently thanks to the HR software.

Businesses that have not considered such a program are missing out on the opportunity to expedite the hiring process. Instead of using the plain eye to scan through hundreds of applications and  questionnaire responses, programs can pick up on specific keywords to identify the best candidates. In July, more than 3.7 million jobs remained unfilled because of inefficient hiring techniques, even though more than 11 million people were looking for a job, Bloomberg explained.

"As human beings, we're actually pretty bad at evaluating other human beings," software executive David Ostberg  told the source. "We're making sure people are using the right data, instead of the traditional methods that were previously thought to be valid but big data's showing are not.